mater mea - Celebrating Motherhood and Women of Color

mater mea podcast episode 001: "Child, Please"

 
Photo credits: J. Quazi King (1-18), Rog Walker (19-20)

Photo credits: J. Quazi King (1-18), Rog Walker (19-20)

mater mea podcast episode 001: "Child, Please"

words: Anthonia Akitunde

Hot nannies and the challenges of being a working mom—our first podcast is live!

 

Cue the air horns, everyone: mater mea's podcast is live!

I'm so excited to share what has been in the works for months. Every other week I'll be talking to Black women about the issues and stories that matter most to us, from work-life balance, self-care, romance, career, entrepreneurship, friendships, parenting, not having kids, and everything under the sun. 

Joining me for the first episode is Ylonda Gault, the author of Child, Please: How Mama's Old-School Lessons Helped Me Check Myself Before I Wrecked Myself, a mom of three, and, as you'll hear, a very hilarious woman. 

What We Talked About...

Why work-life balance and thigh gap is a lie, and why old school moms were probably less crazed than moms today.

What we think about the idea of hot nannies, inspired by Chrissy Teigen’s FABLife comments.

Kerry Washington’s Self profile and general hotness both pre- and post-baby.

This American Life piece on racism and segregation in a Missouri school system.

The Toni Morrison quote about asking for a substantial raise as an editor: "When I wanted a raise, in my employment world, they would give me a little woman’s raise and I would say, ‘No. This is really low.’ And they would say, ‘But,’ and I would say, ‘No, you don’t understand. You’re the head of the household. You know what you want. That’s what I want. I want that. I am on serious business now. This is not girl playing. This is not wife playing. This is serious business. I am the head of a household, and I must work to pay for my children.’”

When Ylonda talks about being the "angry Black woman" at work—“We know we said that first in the meeting!”—it reminded me of this piece our career columnist did on how women of color can deal with imposter syndrome at work.

Don't judge me, guys: The nanny situation on Love and Hip Hop Atlanta.

Ylonda and I talk about growing up in our respective hometowns: Buffalo, New York and Kansas City, Missouri.

 

Things That Gave Us Life...

Ylonda: "To see these women who have it all, so to speak, struggle with that and admit it... I thought that was really brave and really cool and powerful."

Me: Our interview with Elmeka Henderson about her decision to move to Japan was one of our most popular profiles, and inspired our Black Moms Abroad series. It was great to see how many women wrote in to share their story!

 

Subscribe to the mater mea podcast on iTunes and Soundcloud

 

What did you think of our first episode? What topics do you want to hear discussed in the future? Tell us in the comments!